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Nov 30, 2012 8:00pm EST
it happen, but in the civil rights era, for example, when we had those celebrated filibusters, they were not partisan in the sense. they were factional. the fact is the filibusters done by southern democratic senators to oppose civil rights or voting rights legislation were opposed by republicans just as they were by notary -- non-southern departments, and civil rights legislation, overcoming filibusters being enacted was at least as much to the credibility of the senate minority leader as to lyndon johnson so what we've seen now is a regular use of the filibuster now as a partisan tool and not just a group of members of the party, but the entire party as fashioned by the minority leader. the second is the use of the filibuster routinely, not on issues of great national significance, and not simply on those issues with the majority leader kills the amendment tree, but on issues and nominations which ultimately pass unanimously or near unanimously, and keep in mind on no , nomins where holds, which are notices that you will deny unanimous concept, and in some instances have been filibust
Nov 29, 2012 8:00pm EST
and that the message will be clear to those who are violating civil rights so horrendously. and i yield the floor. i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. under the previous order, the questions on amendment numbered 3254 offered by the senator from new hampshire. amendment numbered 3245. excuse me. the senator from new hampshire. is there a sufficient second? there appears to be. the clerk will call the roll. vote: vote: vote: the presiding officer: are there any senators in chambers wishing to vote or wishing to change their vote? if not, the yeas are 54, the nays are 41. the amendment is agreed to. mr. reid reid: move to reconsid. the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: mr. president? mr. president, could we have order. the presiding officer: will the chamber please come to order. may we have orderment -- order. the majority leader. mr. reid: mr. president, we have one more vote t. will take -- start in just a few minutes. senator levin wants to say somethi
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2